Below are the first five pages of Do Geese See God.

For lexicographer, Topher Llewellyn, life is all about the words, until she's left without them after she's hit by lightning during a winter storm.

      Whenever TOPHER speaks in monologue or to people standing/sitting on the ledge, she speaks normally; she is her whole, able-bodied self. When she speaks at other times it is with whatever ease or difficulty as indicated in the scene. Often her verbs are dropped. As the story is being told in reverse, Topher's aphasic, or halting speech, will go from better to worse during the course of the play.
      The play travels backwards in time.
      ACT 1
      AT RISE:
      TOPHER paints at an easel. Off to one side, there's a ledge/elevated platform where EDDIE sits.
      TOPHER
      I wish you were here. I wish we could have a long conversation, back and forth, over Chess. Like the old days.
      EDDIE
      Except there were no old days like that, were there? I’m afraid you treated me like one of Sammy’s temporaries.
      TOPHER
      I did. I’m sorry. Still, I wish we could have had a real conversation then.
      EDDIE
      We’re having one now.
      TOPHER
      In my mind.
      EDDIE
      Yes. I wish you’d get e-mail. When are you going to embrace the 21st Century?
      TOPHER
      Technology is overrated.
      EDDIE
      Topher,you still own a turntable!
      TOPHER
      I still have record albums.
      EDDIE
      Nobody plays records anymore! Or watches black and white television on purpose. Maybe if you owned a cell phone, instead of the old hard-wired kind then maybe none of this would have happened--
      TOPHER
      Stop it! I’ve had my fill of electronic devices for awhile.
      EDDIE
      Well, if you won’t use e-mail, you could write me more often the old fashioned way with pen and paper.
      TOPHER
      Writing is laborious for me.
      EDDIE
      But your letters are word perfect.
      TOPHER
      If only I could--
      EDDIE
      Listen, cheer up! Both of us are still here. Still hanging on.
      TOPHER
      Even if out of time and space.
      EDDIE
      Here, and out there, too, Toph. In real time and space. Don’t forget.
      TOPHER
      Not as free as here, and--
      EDDIE
      (interrupting, changing subject)
      I got your letter yesterday.
      TOPHER
      (beat)
      Did you notice the special stamp?
      EDDIE
      The spacesuit canvas. How did you--
      TOPHER
      Not me, Lily did that.
      EDDIE
      Lily. Of course.
      LILY appears. She does not notice Eddie, because he is not really “here.” She gives Topher a long kiss.
      LILY
      Come to bed, love.
      TOPHER
      S-s-soon.
      LILY considers the painting.
      LILY
      It’s lovely. Like you’ve carved away at the paper to bring out what was already there.
      TOPHER
      Watercolors, that quality. Have.
      LILY
      Yes, they do.
      TOPHER
      Like you. You, quality, too.
      Lily disappears. Topher continues painting.
      EDDIE
      As I said, I got your letter, but it didn’t answer my question.
      TOPHER
      You always have so many questions.
      EDDIE
      You know the one I mean.
      TOPHER
      The one about ghost words. Eddie, you’re showing alarming signs of turning into an authentic word freak.
      EDDIE
      Whose fault is that? Please. Talk to me about ghost words. Give an example.
      TOPHER
      There are no examples, Eddie. “Ghost words” are by nature nonexistent. They’re mistakes that find their way into a dictionary. Mistakes, once discovered, are dropped from a dictionary, vanishing forever from the lexicon. Therefore, my dear, there are no examples I want to give you.
      EDDIE
      I love how you go on and on in your letters, just like that.
      TOPHER
      Talking, like this, in person, or on the phone, I can’t. Especially on the phone. Only slowly, on paper.
      EDDIE
      (pointing to his brain)
      But you can in here, in this metaphysical meeting place we’ve created. Come on, Toph, a ghost word for little old me? I find them haunting. Words that come and go, you know?
      TOPHER
      No, there’s no romantic quality to things which never existed in the first place.
      EDDIE
      Just a few bad mistakes.
      TOPHER
      Lexicographers are human, aren’t we? One of the greatest, Samuel Johnson, said, “There are, in every age, new errors to be rectified.” Even real words with a purpose come and go over time.
      EDDIE
      You’re getting soft.
      TOPHER
      Lily and I are thinking of moving away from here. To some place less volatile.
      EDDIE
      Life is volatile, Toph. Are you ready to leave here?
      TOPHER
      It’s been nearly a whole year since my Divine Intervention.
      EDDIE
      You mean since your accident.
      TOPHER
      Now who’s being picky about word choice? When it happens to you, it feels very personal. It’s like the Gods have reached out of the sky and collectively smacked you across the face.
      EDDIE
      You mean across the room.
      TOPHER
      It was a metaphor.
      EDDIE
      You make it sound like a betrayal. Which is it, a betrayal or an intervention? They’re not the same.
      TOPHER
      It’s both. Nothing is ever the same afterwards.